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Educators Tour Westchester Manufacturers Magnetic Analysis Corp and Safe Flight

Educators visit MAC

Pictured above: Educators tour Magnetic Analysis Corporation in Elmsford, NY.

Last week the Council of Industry, as part of its ongoing efforts to develop a skilled workforce for Hudson Valley Manufacturers, organized a tour for educators of Westchester County manufacturers.  Partnering with The Workforce Development Institute, Westchester Community College, Southern Westchester BOCES, New York State Senator Shelley Mayer, and Westchester County, we chartered a Coach bus and brought 34 administrators, guidance counselors and teachers to see firsthand the careers and career pathways available to their students in manufacturing.

The tour began at Westchester Community College with a presentation covering both credit and non-credit programs available at the college that teach the skillsets for many of these career pathways. Dean Raymond Houston of Westchester Community College’s School of Mathematics, Science, and Engineering, and Tom Curanovic, Curriculum Chair of Mechanical & Civil Technology at WCC, led a tour of the advanced manufacturing center. This included a CAD lab, a CNC lab (with machines donated by Council of Industry member Fryer Machine,) and the electronics lab, along with a description of the training students receive in these classrooms. There was also some discussion from manufacturers taking part in the tour of the jobs and skills they are looking for when hiring and how the training provided by the college and through apprenticeship programs is beneficial.

After the WCC presentation and tour, the group boarded the bus and set off to their first stop, Safe Flight Instrument Corporation, right next to the Westchester County Airport in White Plains. Safe Flight is a leader in aviation safety and flight performance systems.  The company was founded in 1946 and pioneered the development of Stall Warning and Angle of Attack, Automatic Throttle Systems, Wind Shear Warning, and many other innovations in aircraft instrumentation, flight performance, and control systems for fixed and rotary winged aircraft. As part of the tour, the educators learned more about the company’s history and philosophy. We met with the head of Engineering and learned about the numerous patents the company holds as well as how they test their products right here in Westchester. The tour of the production floor was fascinating for the educators, as they were able to see the CNC machines and machine shop, quality assurance testing, and electronics assembly in action and learn more about the types of jobs that are available in this company and what training is necessary to get started here and the opportunities for growth within the company. Then it was back on the bus and off to our next manufacturer. During the drive, Justin Lukach, President of Mircomold Products in Yonkers, talked about his company, how he got into manufacturing, and some innovative ideas they are trying out at Micromold to increase employee engagement.

After a short ride over to Elmsford, the group disembarked on the tour’s next stop, Magnetic Analysis Corporation, where they manufacture instruments, systems and solutions for nondestructive testing to inspect flaws and defects in tube and pipe, bar, rod, wire, cable, billets, and parts. Their products and testing instruments are used in countless countries and territories, in plants and mills where wire, tubing, bars, and metal parts roll through automatic inspection systems without missing a beat. Here we learned about the history of MAC and why their testing equipment is so important and what skills and background they look for when hiring employees. Greg Gionta, MAC Plant Manager, was also a WCC alumna and a great source of information on the career opportunities available to young people interested in working with their hands.  On the tour, we were treated to a CNC demonstration and watched as parts were readied for assembly in a machine worth over $400,000 headed to the oil and gas industry. Then it was back on the bus and we were off to the next stop, a Con Edison station in Rye.

At our last stop, Con Edison, the group learned about the jobs available in the Energy field and the growth opportunities available depending on your education and training. We heard from several current Con Ed employees about their career paths and how they got where they are today. They emphasized the importance of safety in their field and at Con Edison.

The bus ride back to the Community College featured Evangelo Micas, Assistant Principal for Southern Westchester BOCES, who discussed the programs open to high school students to get started on the path to manufacturing and energy careers. The educators came on the tour hoping to find out more about options for students that may, or may not be, college-bound and they came away with new connections to schools, companies and organizations in their community that are eager to find those same kids and expose them to rewarding career pathways in industry. This event was made possible by funding from The Workforce Development Institute. The Council of Industry looks forward to building these relationships to help develop the manufacturing workforce of the future.

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Has Your Company Complied with the October 9, 2019 Sexual Harassment Prevention Training Deadline?

By: Joel J. Greenwald, Esq., Greenwald Doherty, LLP, Council of Industry Associate Member

A reminder to all employers in New York State, that in addition to updating sexual harassment prevention policies, New York law now (effective this past October 2018) requires all employees working any portion of their time in New York State to be trained on sexual harassment prevention on an annual basis. The first annual deadline is fast approaching on October 9, 2019.

  • The law mandates that the training contains certain specific elements and content.
  • The training must be “interactive.” The training can be (although is not required to be) live. It can also be administered online, but must involve more than simply watching a training video or reading a document without eliciting feedback or interaction.  To be deemed “interactive,” the training can include questions at the end of sections that the employee must answer correctly, can be conducted in-person or live with the presenter “interacting” with the employee by asking and/or answering questions, and/or provide an opportunity for employee feedback.   
  • The training must contain a definition and explanation of “sexual harassment,” consistent with guidance provided by New York’s state agencies.
  • The training must provide examples of unlawful sexual harassment.
  • The training must include specific information concerning federal and New York statutes on sexual harassment, and the legal remedies available to victims of sexual harassment.
  • The training must provide information concerning employees’ rights and all available forums (courts, agencies, etc.) for adjudicating complaints.
  • The training must contain information regarding responsibilities of supervisors and information on how to address conduct by supervisors.

                  With less than a month left until the October 9th deadline, employers should contact counsel to discuss their options and firm up arrangements for their training if not yet already completed. 

Joel J. Greenwald, Esq., is the managing partner of Greenwald Doherty, LLP, an employment and labor law firm, representing management exclusively, and can be reached at (845) 589-9300 or jg@greenwaldllp.com.

 DISCLAIMER:  The foregoing is a summary of the laws discussed above for the purpose of providing a general overview of these laws. These materials are not meant, nor should they be construed, to provide information that is specific to any law(s). The above is not legal advice and you should consult with counsel concerning the applicability of any law to your particular situation.

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Compressed Air Systems and COMAIRCO’s Compressed Air Challenge

Read about ways to save money by reducing or eliminating unnecessary use of compressed air from the University of Minnesota’s Technical Assistance Program 

Approximately 70% of all manufacturers have a compressed air system. These systems power a variety of equipment, including machine tools, material handling and separation equipment, and spray painting equipment. Compressed air is one of the most expensive uses of energy in a manufacturing plant. About 8hp of electrical power is used to generate the electricity required for 1hp of compressed air, making it the least efficient and sustainable plant utility.  While there are applications that require the use of compressed air, many uses of compressed air can be eliminated to save money. Calculating the cost of compressed air in your facility can help you justify system improvements that increase energy efficiency. This page offers tips for increasing your compressed air system’s efficiency and decreasing costs.

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Find out about COMAIRCO’s Compressed Air Challenge Seminar 

Learn about Energy Efficiency in Compressed Air Systems 

When: June 4th from 7:30 am – 5 pm at The Crown Plaza in Suffern, NY 
Speaker: David Booth, Fundamentals of Compressed Air Systems
Cost: $295 per person, includes continental, breakfast, lunch, breaks and materials
Click here for agenda and registration

 

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What To Do About Millennials & Generation Z in the Manufacturing Workplace

 

By Guest Blogger: Skip Weisman 

I continue to hear complaints from business owners about the younger “millennial” generation in the workplace. I find it comical. I really do.

There are a couple of reasons for this:

1) The “younger” generation has always been a problem in the workplace. Even the more senior/veteran generation in the current workplace was the problem in the workplace when they were the younger generation.

2) This “younger” millennial generation is currently leading some of the largest, most highly valued companies in the world, so they can’t be all bad. I’m talking about people like, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, and:

  • Lyft found John Zimmer, 34
  • Spotify founder Daniel Ek, 35
  • Instagram founder, Mike Krieger, 32
  • WordPress founder, Matthew Mullenweg, 34

Before you give me a hard time that it’s all men in that list, check out this list of 15 female millennial and Generation Z (the generation after the Millennials) entrepreneurs you haven’t heard of yet, but you may very soon.

3) A generation is a very long window of time, between 15-20 years. As I have posited to my audiences in my seminars on this topic, “do you think an older Millennial at 35 years of age, has the same needs, desires, and interests as a 21 year old Millennial?” They all agree the answer is “no.”

My point is that there are good and bad people in every generation, there are wide variances in needs, desires, and interests across the timeline of people in each generation. It’s time to stop blasting an entire generation.

Do those in the Millennial generation and Generation Z have different attitudes, habits, work ethics, and interests than those in the older generation? Absolutely! 

Is the younger generation growing up without an interest in working with their hands beyond typing on a keyboard or using their thumbs to communicate? Absolutely!

Is this going to make it harder for manufacturing companies to find qualified, skilled, and already trained workers to step into roles? Absolutely!

Just like every younger generation always has different quirks than the older generation. 

Yes, it may be more acute than ever for manufacturers and other trade industries because of the dearth in fundamental skills required in those work environments, but it’s not impossible to overcome.

It starts with a mindset shift on the part of the leaders of the manufacturing firms. Instead of expecting ready made machinists, welders, and others needed in a manufacturing process, it may require an expectation of finding those who want an opportunity to learn a trade and invest in them first.

This may have some advantages:

  • They come with little or no bad habits in doing your type of work.
  • You can mold them to be what you need them to be and teach them your way from the beginning.
  • They become pretty loyal since you and those at your company gave them a chance and became their mentor.

Every generation comes into the work environment with some deficiencies that cause challenges for those in charge and need to get things done. It’s just our turn now to be on that side.

Some may remember that back in the 1950s and early 60s when the older generation was thinking Elvis Presley and the Beatles were undermining society?

At the beginning of the 1970s the flower children of the late 60s came into the workforce with an attitude to “not trust anyone over 30.”

Not long after I started my small business coaching and consulting,  about 10 years ago, I had a client who complained to me about the work ethic and the focus of his Gen Y employees.

His complaint was that they weren’t motivated enough for advancement. They were too complacent and comfortable and only wanted to focus on their personal life and family. They weren’t ambitious enough for him.

Now, this generation, for some, is too ambitious. They have an “entitlement” mentality, think they know it all and should be advancing before they’re ready.*

You can’t have it both ways.  And, I will argue you should want more of the latter and less of the former. They’re easier to mold and coach to become what they want and what you may need.

I say embrace that latter mentality and use it to your company’s advantage.

Every one of my clients has at least one young millennial who is a superstar at their company, pushing older generation folks to get better, faster, up to speed on technology.

I think that’s a good thing.

Maybe the problem isn’t the younger generation in the workforce but the older generation doing the hiring.

And, remember, if you’re still worried about the Millennial generation in the workplace, it’s too late. You better start learning about Generation Z, which is already starting to infiltrate the workplace.  

*(SIDE NOTE: You may also have the alternative “entitlement” mentality. That’s the other end of the generation scale with veteran employees who expect to have their job and their salary increases without improving their skills, keeping up with technology, not expecting to have to bring any additional value to the company as they wait for the calendar to turn the page to retirement.)

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The Certificate in Manufacturing Leadership Program is Filling Up Fast

The Council of Industry has offered quality supervisory training to its members in the Hudson Valley for over 20 years. The Certificate in Manufacturing Leadership is a comprehensive group of courses that prepares supervisors for their challenging positions at manufacturing facilities. The program is designed to offer particular skill sets through day-long courses designed by manufacturers to help participants meet the challenges of the modern workplace. Participants who complete the required courses are presented with the Certificate in Manufacturing Leadership presented by the Council of Industry and Dutchess Community College. In the last few years, a few classes have gone to waitlists so don’t hesitate, register soon.

All courses are full-day classes (from 9 am – 4:30 pm) and are held at Dutchess Community College, Poughkeepsie, NY with morning coffee and lunch included on site. Though participants are encouraged to complete the course series for the most comprehensive leadership education, the Council welcomes individual course registration as well. The Early Bird Special discount ends tomorrow December 21st. Register and pay online or mail a check to receive the substantial saving from this special offer.

Classes include:

Program Cost

One Day Course Single Member: $200.00 Two or More from Same Company: $175.00 each Single Non-Member: $375.00 Early Bird Discount: $185 (must register and pay before 12/21)

Fundamentals of Leadership Single Member: $400.00 Two or More from Same Company: $350.00 each Single Non-Member: $700.00 Early Bird Discount: $370 (must register and pay before 12/21)

Entire Program Single Member: $1,700.00 Two or More from Same Company: $1,550.00 each Single Non-Member: $2,600.00 Early Bird Discount: $1600 single, $1450 each two or more from the same company (must register and pay before 12/21).

Online registration is available at https://www.councilofindustry.org/training/course-list/?ccat=certificate-in-manufacturing.  If you have questions or need help registering contact Alison Butler (abutler@councilofindustry.org) or call (845) 565-1355.

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Supervisor Training at SUNY Westchester this Fall

The Council of Industry is offering a series of classes in Manufacturing Leadership at SUNY Westchester this fall. For over 20 years now we have been providing supervisor training to hundreds of employees for our members through the Certificate in Manufacturing Leadership Program, a comprehensive set of one-day classes designed specifically to provide the skills and tools to succeed in today’s manufacturing workplace.

Classes include Fundamentals of Leadership, a two-day course that has includes participants completing a DISC profile beforehand, a personality tool for understanding their behaviors as a leader; Best Practices & Continuous Improvement; Problem Solving & Decision Making; EHS Essentials; Making a Profit in Manufacturing; HR Management Issues; and Positive Motivation & Discipline. Individuals can enroll in just one or two classes or the entire program.

The program begins on September 18th and runs until December 5th. All classes are full day (9 am – 4:30 pm) and include morning coffee and lunch is provided. Time is running out and registrations must be in by September 11th. Below are pricing options:

 One Day Course
Single Member: $200.00
Two or More from Same Company: $175.00 each
Single Non-Member: $375.00

Fundamentals of Leadership (2 day class)
Single Member: $400.00
Two or More from Same Company: $350.00 each
Single Non-Member: $700.00

Entire Program (8 full days of training)
Single Member: $1,450
Two or More from Same Company: $1,275 each
Single Non-Member: $2,875
Two or more from the same company (non-members) $2,325

 

For course descriptions and dates follow this link: https://www.councilofindustry.org/training/course-list/?ccat=sunywestchester-certificate-program

You can register online: https://connect.gomembers.com/f/fid.php?id=d6662d0e9ff27bf36b7f196e8b67be86

If you have questions or would like to register via email training@councilofindustry.org or call (845) 565-1355.

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The Potential of Augmented Reality to Reshape Worker Training

Could augmented reality, or AR, be the way forward for the manufacturing workforce? The problems manufacturing faces with building a skilled workforce have been well documented. New workers coming into the plant are faced with having to adapt to a new work environment of collaborative robots and machine learning-driven applications. At the same time, they have to maintain, or in some cases re-learn, the legacy knowledge that is being lost as older generations exit the workforce. Can AR, an interactive experience of a real-world environment whose elements are “augmented” by computer-generated perceptual information, solve that problem?

Plenty of companies, from large entities like Microsoft to smaller companies and even startups, are pointing AR toward the challenge of worker training. In theory, it could allow trainees an up close look at incredibly complicated machines, and give them an opportunity to work with them in a way that simulates the experience far more effectively than a traditional classroom could, while also keeping them from having to operate the real thing before they are ready. The technology though is still new, and until its is more refined there are reasons to be skeptical of how effectively it could replicate the experience.

Learn More about what people are saying

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