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1.10.19

Join The Recruiting Initiative

The Council of Industry has launched a Collaborative Recruiting Initiative, designed to allow HV Manufacturing companies to work together to promote the manufacturing sector, attract candidates and ultimately pace them into manufacturing jobs. 

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Having Trouble Finding Candidates? Have You Considered Attracting Veterans?

By Guest Blogger Michaela Ryan, Council of Industry Intern

In the manufacturing industry, one of the challenges that we all face is attracting quality candidates. Have you ever thought about trying to reach veterans through your candidate search? Did you know that jobs can be made searchable by MOS code? MOS codes are a specific code used in the military that identifies a particular job. Each MOS code has its own job description. Active members and veterans typically know their MOS code like the back of their hand. Therefore, when a veteran is searching for a civilian job, they know that they have the qualified skills and experience if it aligns with their MOS code. This information is being implemented in various recruitment strategies when trying to attract veterans for job openings.

The Manufacturing Industry aligns nicely with many of these MOS code job descriptions. Much of the work they do is hands-on work with machines, which fits perfectly into the Manufacturing Industry. Finding information on this is simple. When you search “MOS code job search” in Google, MOS translators for civilian jobs are the first links to pop up. For example, MOS code 44E is the code for a Machinist in the Army. A veteran could type “44E” into the MOS translator and it would present a list of job openings that align with their background as a machinist in the Army. It allows veterans to use their gained experiences and skills from the military and put those skills and experiences to use in civilian jobs.

Recruiters, such as yourselves,  can implement MOS code compatibility into your recruitment process by providing applicable MOS codes into your job postings. Multiple MOS codes can align with a single job. You can find a list of MOS codes categorized by military branch, for example, an Army MOS code list and a Marine MOS code list can be found here. There are numerous resources online when trying to figure out which MOS codes could apply to your job openings. This can help veterans find jobs faster that align with their prior experience and it can help you find qualified candidates by reaching a new market. This could open new doors for access to skilled candidates!

The Council of Industry started matching the jobs in our Recruiting Initiative to corresponding MOS codes. We started this to open new doors for our members to try and help solve this problem of finding qualified candidates. All of the applicable jobs will have a list of corresponding MOS code(s) implemented into the job description/posting. This will allow veterans to know that they qualify for that particular job and it will also make the job searchable by MOS code. Anyone can go to our website (Link Here) and search an MOS code and all applicable jobs will appear for candidates to easily apply. Our hope is to reach a broader candidate base for our members, as well as, assist veterans in their job search.

The Council of Industry started this process and implemented a few MOS codes into some applicable jobs already, but we need your help! As you know the jobs and qualifications better than anyone, we encourage you, as our members to follow suit and start thinking about this idea when creating a new job post. You can do this by going to the links above and searching for titles and job descriptions that are most relevant to your openings. Once you do this, you can add those applicable MOS codes into the job description. If you are apart of our Recruiting Initiative and joined iCIMS, once the MOS codes are implemented into the job posting, veterans can go to our website and search for their MOS code. If your job lists their MOS code, it will immediately show up. This will help you reach a new market of qualified candidates, in hope to help with your recruiting process.

Making MOS codes searchable with job openings is a new opportunity for you, as members, to attract veterans. By simply implementing this into your recruiting process, you can increase your likelihood of finding the quality candidate you’ve been looking for. Many other companies within various industries have already started to implement this into their recruitment process and there are a variety of tools readily available to assist in the implementation of this process. If you would like to attract veterans or find a new market of candidates during your recruitment process, this could be what you are looking for. If you have any questions or need help starting this process, feel free to reach out to us! We will be more than happy to help.

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E Verify Services Unavailable During Government Shutdown

E-Verify—the federal electronic employment eligibility verification service—has expired due to a lapse in funding and will not be available during the partial shutdown of the U.S. government that began Dec. 22, 2018.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which oversees the program, announced that the website www.e-verify.gov will not be actively managed and will not be updated until after funding is restored. The agency reported that “information on this website may not be up to date. Transactions submitted via this website might not be processed and we will not be able to respond to inquiries until after appropriations are enacted.”

Follow this link to find out what is unavailable and what policies have been implemented to minimize impact to employers:

https://www.e-verify.gov/e-verify-and-e-verify-services-are-unavailable

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New York Minimum Wage Increases

From Ethan Allen Workforce Solutions, a Council of Industry Associate Member

An increase in the minimum wage, intended to eventually bring New York’s state minimum wage to $15 an hour, went into effect on December 31.

As a result of a measure signed into law in April 2016, the state will continue to see minimum wage increases implemented on a regional basis. The state’s current basic minimum wage is $10.40 an hour.

Under this law, New York City employers with 11 or more employees will see the minimum wage go to $15 an hour on December 31. New York City employers with fewer than 11 employees will see the minimum wage increase to $13.50 on December 31 and rise $1.50 next year, reaching $15 at the end of 2019.

Long Island and Westchester counties will see the minimum wage rise to $12 on December 31 and then go up $1 per year, reaching $15 at the end of 2021.

The rest of the state will see the minimum wage hit $11.10 on December 31 and go up 70 cents per year until it reaches $12.50 at the end of 2020. After that, the minimum wage will continue to increase to $15 an hour on an indexed schedule.

The law contains a “safety valve” that will allow state officials beginning in 2019 to consider the effects of wage increases on regional economies before permitting scheduled increases to go into effect.

The minimum salary required for administrative and executive employees to be exempt from overtime pay in New York State is set to increase as well. Beginning December 31, 2018, the salary thresholds are as follows:

               NYC employers with 11 or more employees, $1,125 per week.

               NYS employers with 10 or fewer employees, $1,012.50 per week.

               For Nassau, Westchester, and Suffolk County employers, $900 per week.

               For other employers, $832 per week.

 

We are currently reviewing all employee pay rates and will be in touch shortly to discuss any necessary pay adjustments. If you have any questions, please contact us at 845-471-1200

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Social Security Administration ‘No Match’ Letters to Employers Make Another Comeback

By Sean G. Hanagan, Jackson Lewis P.C.,  a Council of Industry Associate Member

Social Security Administration (SSA) has begun notifying employers that the information reported on an individual employee’s W-2 form does not match the SSA’s records with “Request for Employer Information” letters, known as “No-Match” letters.

SSA started sending these controversial informational requests in 1993, but the practice has waxed and waned in part due to litigation. In 2011, SSA resumed the practice of notifying employers of social security number mismatches. But in 2012, the Obama Administration decided to simply stop the practice.

Now, the letters are back! In July 2018, probably in response to President Donald Trump’s Buy American, Hire American Executive Order, SSA re-started the practice by sending “informational notifications” to employers and third party providers telling them of mismatches on their 2017 Forms W-2 and explaining where to find helpful resources. The plan was to send 225,000 of these notices every two weeks. Starting in Spring 2019, notices will be sent regarding 2018 Forms W-2s, but these letters, unlike the “informational” letters, will tell employers that corrections are necessary.

A mismatch does not necessarily mean that there is any wrongdoing. It can be caused by an administrative error: numbers can be reversed, names might be misspelled or changed, for instance, due to marriage. But once a letter is received, in determining how to respond, employers find themselves caught between agencies. SSA wants to maintain accurate records of earnings. ICE wants to ensure compliance with employment verification laws. And the Immigrant and Employee Rights Section of the Department of Justice (IER) wants to ensure that employers are not discriminating on the basis of citizenship, nationality or by pursuing unfair documentary practices in violation of the INA.

What is an employer to do?

  1. Don’t take any adverse action against an employee based on a No-Match letter alone.
  2. Compare the SSA information with the individual’s employment records.
  3. If the employer’s records match, ask the employee to check the name and number on his or her Social Security card.
  4. If there is a mistake on the card or the card needs to be changed or corrected, ask the employee to reach out to SSA to resolve the issue.

If the issue is not easily resolved, the employer should contact legal counsel. There are no “safe harbors.” Each case is different and must be analyzed individually to avoid missteps and penalties from either SSA, ICE, or IER.

 

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Ban the Box: Westchester County Passes Legislation Prohibiting Conviction History Questions on Job Applications

By: Jacqueline A. Smith, from Bond, Schoeneck & King PLLC, a Council of Industry Associate Member

Following the trend of other counties and municipalities throughout New York State who have adopted “fair chance” or “ban the box” legislation, the Westchester County Board of Legislators passed a local law on December 3 which would prohibit employers from inquiring about an applicant’s criminal conviction or arrest record in employment applications. The law, which will go into effect 90 days after it is signed by the County Executive, also bans employment advertisements, solicitations, or publications containing any “limitation, or specification in employment based on a person’s arrest record or criminal conviction.”

Earlier this year, County Executive George Latimer signed an Executive Order that banned criminal conviction questions on any applications for employment with the County government. The County Executive’s office released a statement confirming that he intends to sign this legislation that will extend the prohibition to other employers within the County as well.

Unlike New York City’s “ban the box” law that prohibits any inquiries relating to an applicant’s criminal history until after a conditional offer of employment has been extended, the Westchester County law explicitly allows an employer to make such inquiries after the employee submits his/her employment application. However, the Westchester County law reiterates the employer’s obligation to perform an analysis of the applicant’s criminal record and other factors under New York State Correction Law Article 23-A before taking any adverse employment action based on the applicant’s criminal history.

Notably, this law does not apply to applications for employment as a police officer, peace officer, or at a law enforcement agency, as statutorily defined and referenced in the law. The law also does not apply to “any actions taken by an employer pursuant to any state, federal or County law that requires criminal background checks for employment purposes or bars employment based on criminal history.”

Employers located within Westchester County should take this opportunity to review their employment applications to ensure that they do not contain any questions related to an applicant’s criminal conviction or arrest record.

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How to Attract Veterans

 

By Guest Blogger Michaela Ryan 

Did you know that jobs are searchable by MOS codes? MOS codes are a specific code used in the military that identify a particular job. Each MOS code has its own job description. Active members and veterans typically know their MOS code like the back of their hand. Therefore, when a veteran is searching for a civilian job, they know that they have the qualified skills and experience if it aligns with their MOS code. This information is being implemented into various recruitment strategies when trying to attract veterans for job openings.      

Finding information on this is simple. When you search “MOS code job search” in Google, MOS translators for civilian jobs are the first links to pop up. For example, MOS code 44E is the code for a Machinist in the Army. A veteran could type “44E” into the MOS translator and it would present a list of job openings that align with their background as a machinist in the Army. It allows veterans to use their gained experiences and skills from the military and put those skills and experiences to use in civilian jobs. Recruiters can implement MOS code compatibility into their recruitment process by providing applicable MOS codes in their job postings. Multiple MOS codes can align with a single job. You can also find a list of MOS codes categorized by military branch, for example an Army MOS code list and a Marine MOS code list can be found here. There are numerous resources online when trying  to figure out which MOS codes could apply to your job openings. This can help veterans find jobs faster that align with their prior experience and it can help you find qualified candidates by reaching a new market. This could open new doors for access to skilled candidates!

The Council of Industry has started matching the jobs in our Recruiting Initiative to their corresponding MOS codes. As the Council of Industry works with Manufacturing Companies throughout the Hudson Valley, many of the skills and required experience needed for these types of jobs closely aligns with those of veterans. All of the applicable jobs will have a list of corresponding MOS code(s) implemented into the job description/posting. This will allow veterans to know that they qualify for that particular job and it will also make the job searchable by MOS code. Anyone can go to our website (Link Here) and search an MOS code and all applicable jobs will appear for candidates to easily apply. Our hope is to reach a broader candidate base for our members, as well as, assist veterans in their job search.           

Making MOS codes searchable with job openings is a new opportunity for recruiters to attract veterans. By implementing this into your recruiting process, you can increase your likelihood of finding the quality candidate you’ve been looking for. Many companies have already started to implement this into their recruitment process and there are a variety of tools readily available to assist in the implementation of this process. If you would like to attract veterans or find a new market of candidates during your recruitment process, this could be what you are looking for.

*If you’re a veteran looking for a career in manufacturing search your MOS code here, by typing your MOS code into the search bar.*

 

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